Maggie On The Rez

Me /

25 May 2012

 

Maggie is our Jack Russell Terrier. She loves to swim in our pool and had her first trip on the Rez this past weekend. We plan to bring her out again this holiday weekend for some fun in the sun on the H20.

 

Google Taking On Facebook’s Open Graph With What It Calls The Knowledge Graph

Editorial, The Internets / , , , , , , ,

17 May 2012

 

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/05/introducing-knowledge-graph-things-not.html

In my work as an Information Architect, I’ve increasingly been drawn to cross-website classification and relationship definition methods like Facebook’s Open Graph, Schema.org, and Microformats.org. For the un-indoctrinated, these are code systems which allow websites to add metadata to semantic elements on the web to help machines provide additional context and meaning to content. With three different standards to choose from, I’ve often wondered which to implement on our clients’ behalf.

Background

While microformats and rich snippets have been around for years, its only been the last 24 or so months where their usage has become a must for most web projects. I’d point to a watershed moment a couple years back when Facebook really started to gain momentum as a platform for brands to setup shop and interact with their customers / audiences. It was at this time that we in the business were having a difficult time dealing with the many ‘phantom’ places, businesses, employers, and other Open Graph nodes that would pop up and become associated with a brand.

What was happening was that Facebook was automatically creating these ‘properties’ based on links, geographic information, and user profile data and other sources like Wikipedia entries for example.

Clients were often up in arms about how Facebook could go ahead and just create pages without their consent. (Some even inquired about legal action!) Luckily, things have generally calmed down as most people have become accustomed to the phenomenon of Facebook or other entities creating web properties on their behalf.

The Challenge

In any event, over the past year or so, Facebook has been amassing a HUGE collection of open graph nodes as brands eager to participate in the Facebook ecosystem have taken steps to more accurately depict themselves using Open Graph terminology.  The fear I would imagine from competing enterprises would be that if Facebook were able to continue along this path in out-contextualizing items on the web, they may be able to further lure sheeple and businesses into the Micro-net that is Facebook.

Google Is On The Scene Big Time

I’ve witnessed a variety of trends which point to Google wanting desperately to begin to create its own method to offer contextualized information.

Schema.org – Roughly six months ago, I started seeing a concerted effort by Google to promote the use of Schema.org code in websites through updating the Webmaster Tools Help content to include step by step directions as well as utilities to help developers create compliant code.

Google Docs Research Pane - This week, Google introduced a new feature to Google Docs which provides contextual content suggestions (definitions, photos, etc.) in a sidebar pane.

YouTube Auto Created Channels – I’m not sure when these automatically generated channels started sprouting up, but YouTube now has a variety of auto-generated, topic-specific collections of videos one can subscribe to. I would assume its using meta-data and tagging to help create these channels and would also assume that this content will be available via search, research, and in social contexts.

Google Search – Just this week, Google started promoting what they are calling the Knowledge Graph. Similar to Facebook’s Open Graph, Google’s Knowledge Graph will bring relevant, contextual information to users.

Prediction Time

 

Klout Thinks I’m Influential Concerning Brett Favre

The Internets / , , , ,

15 May 2012

 

I honestly don’t believe I’ve ever tweeted, posted, or plus’ed anything at all to do with Prezi or Brett Favre. But since Klout things I’m influential on these subjects, its probably best I go on the record about them.

Prezi

I think Prezi is an awesome tool. A co-worker referenced a presentation of his work-history / skills when applying for a job  at Mad Genius and, well, he’s a co-worker now so you can see its an impressive way to present information. I do prefer non-flash options such as impress.js however.

Brett Favre

I think Brett Favre probably used to rat-tail weaker kids in the Jr. High lockeroom. He’s made some egregious errors in judgement but he’s human though and everyone makes mistakes in life. His performance after the death of his father was notable and exciting to watch. I felt as though him going to the Vikings was less than admirable and I hate everything about the Jets so there’s that.

 

Google Features My Quote On Google Apps for Business Marketing Site

Me / ,

7 May 2012

 

Quote by Rob Rubinoff on Google

Check out http://www.google.com/enterprise/apps/business/landing/campaign/smb/#calendar to view the whole site.

 

These Stormtroopers Have Moves!

Found / ,

1 May 2012

 

 

Mining Near Earth Asteroids For Precious Resources

Found / , ,

25 April 2012

 

My initial reaction:

Never gonna happen.

My reaction after reading who’s involved:

Wow, if anyone can do this it might just this team of uber-successful visionary folks with oodles of dinero.

Buena Suerte Planetary Resources.

 

Mississippi Leads U.S. in Teen Pregnancy Rate

Culture / , , ,

17 April 2012

 

(src)

Live Births / 1,000 Teens (15-19) 2010

Mississippi = 55

U.S. Avg =  34.3

New Hampshire = 15.7

src: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db89.pdf


Challenge Question (100 pts) :

What similarities can you find in the states with common teen birth rates?
(Hint: look for states that share a similar color)

a) Political
b) Socio-Economic
c) Religious
d) Education
e) Historical
f) All the Above

 

Columbia House Continues to Serve as Country’s Prime Poor Financial Decision Making Tool

Culture, Editorial / , ,

11 April 2012

 

The year was 1983. I was 12 years old. My parents were out one weekend night and a super-cool 16 year-old boy from down the street was our sitter. I relished having male teen-age boys as our sitter because I could learn about popular culture, dating, music, etc. Out of nowhere the sitter told me about this awesome service whereby I could sign-up and get 13 records for just a penny. A Penny! And if I joined, he’d get an album for free. WIN-WIN right?

I browsed the catalog looking at the flashy album covers with visions of me driving a muscle car and blasting tunes with the windows open. Mind you I had no personal music taste at this point in my life. I simply enjoyed what my parents enjoyed and what we listened to in our custom-conversion-van on long trips from Miami to the Adirondack Mountains (Big Moose Lake) each summer. Our familial playlist consisted of easy adult contemporary greats such as Anne Murray, Christopher Cross, John Denver, Kenny Rodgers, Billy Joel, and still a favorite of mine, Harry Belafonte (Live at Carnegie Hall).

When the sitter showed me the catalog I really had no idea what records to pick so he helped me pick some – some AC/DC, Foreigner, Ozzy Osbourne, Cheap Trick, Styx, Journey, etc. Little did I know however that I would be on the hook to purchase additional albums at inflated prices for the remainder of my natural born life. After a year or more of me not following directions and sending back albums or tapes I had no interest in, my attorney father stepped in and with a nice letter on his letterhead was able to release me from a lifetime of Columbia House servitude.

Columbia House Still In Business

Much to my surprise, Columbia House is still peddling the same business model – only now with DVD’s. I imagine it took them ages to move from CD’s to DVD’s and it looks like the game may be up for them as even the DVD and home video market has become so thoroughly disrupted by Netflix, et al. Despite the rising cliff of market-force opposition to their model, they still cling to the same pitch. Get 3 DVD’s for only $2.99 and then be on the hook for a new DVD each month for the exorbitant sum of around $25.

I wonder how many other kids learned from a Columbia House experience?

 

Russian Kids Are Bat-$h1t Crazy Insane

Found, The Internets / ,

3 April 2012

 

Cruising the Google + during my lunch break, and I came across a video of some Russian kids atop a snow covered roof operating a clearly make-shift bungee jump / rope swing a dozen plus stories in the air. Very frightening. What’s more frightening however is that when I finished the vid, YouTube prompted me to watch several other examples of crazy Russian adolescents doing equally dangerous things like:

Swinging from the top of a snow-covered roof


Walking atop an outrageously high girder


Scaling to the top of a ridiculously tall Moscow bridge

 

Digital Magazine The Redditor Compiles Popular Reddits For Traditional Magazine-Like Consumption

Culture, The Internets /

27 March 2012

 

I’ve seen things come full circle. Just as esteemed bastions of the print world like the NYT, The Boston Globe, and The Atlantic remake themselves into digitally focused media organizations, along comes The Redditor which distills popular sub-reddits/threads into creepily magazine-like PDF’s – ostensibly for offline / print consumption.

I’ve seen online collections turned into print pieces before. Distro from Engadget puts together a monthly PDF of their content. What’s really cool about The Redditor however is that most of what is produced on Reddit comes from individual redditors – not tech industry journalists with questionable objectivity.

 

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